AERIAL REFUELING IN THE VICINITY OF THE NTTR

(Refueling routes used during Red Flag)

This information is from the "FLIP" AP1B found at https://164.214.2.62/products/digitalaero/index.cfm 


The FLIP document contains a refueling map of the US. The map shown here is the area around Nevada cropped out. The tracks nearest the NTTR are 625H, 625L, 635, 641A, and 641B. Also in the state are helicopter routes AR230V and AR231V

Click on the buttons above for a detailed map of each airspace. Click here for a Garmin mapsource file with the waypoints of these refueling routes.


The data below is the detailed information for each track from the FLIP AP1B manual. To understand the nomenclature, the official instructions can be found here. The coordinates are listed in both bearing and range, using the VOR as a reference, and longitude/lattitude. [To understand the bearing-range information, use  MVA 164/85 as an example. That location would be a bearing of 164 degrees at a distance of 85 nautical miles from the VORTAC location.]

The frequencies used in the refueling (assuming you were too lazy to read the instructions) are found under the column heading "CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR". The frequency (a) is the primary, and (B) is the back-up.


Glossary for terms used in the tables below

From USAF AFPAM 10-1403 

Air refueling track = A track designated for air refueling reserved by the receiver unit/planner. If possible, the track from the ARIP to the ARCP should be along a TACAN/VORTAC radial and within 100 NM of the station.

Air Refueling Initial Point (ARIP) = A point located upstream from the ARCP at which the receiver aircraft initiates a rendezvous with the tanker.

Air Refueling Control Point (ARCP) = The planned geographic point over which the receiver(s) arrive in the observation/precontact position with respect to the assigned tanker.

Air Refueling Control Time (ARCT) = The planned time that the receiver and tanker will arrive over the air refueling control point (ARCP).

Air Refueling Exit Point (AR EXIT PT) = The designated geographic point at which the refueling track terminates. In a refueling anchor it is a designated point where the tanker and rceiver may depart the anchor area after refueling is completed.

Anchor point = A designated geographical point on the down stream end of the inbound course of the Anchor Refueling Pattern.

Anchor refueling = Air refueling performed as the tankers maintain a prescribed pattern which is anchored to a geographical point or fix.

Anchor Rendezvous = The procedures normally employed by radar (CRC/GCI/AWACS) to vector the tanker(s) and receiver(s) for a visual join-up for refueling.


For the terminally anal retentive, DSN is the Defense Switched Network (i.e. military telephone system), while the "C" or commercial number is the phone system the rest of us use.


AR624

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency 366.3, Back-up frequency 319.5 multiple exit frequencies of 124.2, 124.85, 135.25, 343.6, 319.2, 306.3


AR625H AR625L

AR625H and AR625L are identical except for the altitude and frequencies used.

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency: 295.8MHz; Back-up frequency 319.5MHz; Exit frequency: 319.8MHz

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency: 291.9 MHz; Back-up frequency 319.5MHz; Exit frequency: 319.8MHz ( I suspect the ARCP frequency of 319.5 is a typo).


AR635

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency: 352.6MHz; Back-up frequency 319.5MHz; Exit frequency: 360.8MHz


AR641A

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency: 295.4MHz; Back-up frequency 319.5MHz; Exit frequency: 343.6MHz


AR641B

Using the information under the CR PLAN MILITARY RADAR column:

Primary frequency: 295.4MHz; Back-up frequency 319.5MHz; Exit frequency: 385.8MHz


AR230V

 


AR231V

 


Further Reading

FAA instructions on aerial refueling  

NATO guide to aerial refueling 

Boeing KC135